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Friday
Dec022011

A Huck Finn Map

Geography is crucial to Twain's story, not only because the novel is the story of a journey, but because that journey rides the line between slave states and free.

Here's a map of Huck's trip down the Mississippi River with Jim. The actual town names are given in standard type and their fictional representations (that is, as they appear in the novel) are in parenthesis just below. The shaded states are "free" states (although "free" is a relative term for the time period of the novel--as we'll no doubt discuss).

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